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20130201
20130228
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for the worst. >> tom: i'm tom hudson. the u.s. trade gap narrows as the world buys more made in america products and the u.s. buys less foreign oil. >> susie: and with gas prices rising, chevy hopes its new diesel chevy cruze will attract buyers looking for more miles per gallon. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r." >> susie: millions of people are bracing tonight for a powerful snow storm that could cripple the east coast. some forecasters say this could be the blizzard of the century with record amounts of snow and extremely strong winds. in parts of the northeast, transportation was shut down. the governors of massachusetts and connecticut declared a state of emergency and banned car travel, train service and cancelled flights in and out of boston. while the worst of the storm has yet to hit, many businesses and cities were busy making prarations today. erika ller repor. >> reporter: this monstrous storm is already being compared to the great blizzard of '78, when vast amounts of snow blanketed the ohio valley and the great lakes. that storm lasted 36 hours, leaving cars strande
council resolution. >> reporter: the u.s. ambassador to the u.n., susan rice, echoed the strong criticism. >> the actions of north korea are a threat to regional peace and security, international peace and security, and they are not acceptable. they will not be tolerated. and they will be met with north korea's increasing isolation and pressure under united nations sanctions. >> reporter: the security council was quick to condemn the test. it also responded quickly in december when north korea successfully launched a long-range missile. the test could bring north korea closer to developing a nuclear warhead that is small enough to be mounted on a missile. critics point out that the security council members feel that the threat of north korea's program is becoming more rea than ever before. >> so miki, what's next? will the security council adopt tougher sanctions against north korea? >> reporter: well, the u.s., along with south korea, australia, and european members are all for tougher sanctions. these may include tightening the noose on north korea's financial institutions and weapons t
>>> they want to snow why another crew locked onto a helicopter. japanese and u.s. officials are urging the chinese to ensure such accidents don't happen again. a chinese navy aimed at a helicopter in mid-january. japa controls the islands. china and taiwan claim them. >> translator: it's extremely regrettable that such a unilateral provocative action has been taken. we will strongly urge the chinese to exercise restraint and not make the situation any worse. >> a spokesperson said she learned about the incident through the media. japanese government officials say the chinese are trying to give the impression they're not behind the incidents. >>> the u.s. defense secretary says it could have had grave consequences. l leon panetta says it could inflame intentions. >> they have to be part of family of nations in that region working gether. >> panetta said the united states, south korea and japan will do everything possible to ensure their territories are secu secure. he called on china to avoid antagonizing other nations. the former secretary of state said u.s. officials oppose
>>> long road ahead. authorities in the u.s. investigate the dreamliner and find its batteries could keep it on the ground for sometime to come. u.s. transportation investigators cast doubt on a quick fix for the problems facing the dreamliner. they say regulators need to rethink their approval of batteries used in the boeing 787. a number of agencies are looking in to a string of safety incidents. deborah hershman chairs. she said a lithium ion battery sparked a fire a month ago on a japan airlines yet in boston. >> this investigation has demonstrated that a short circuit in a single cell can propagate to adjacent cells and result in smoke and fire. >> engineers packaged eight cells together in designing the battery system for the dreamliner. hersman said they did not place them far enough apart so trouble in one of them could affect the others. she said investigators have not determined why the batteries short circuited. another battery fire forced the pilot of a dreamline tore make an emergency last month in western japan. u.s. authorities grounded all 787s. officials at boe
york times" on syria and whether the president may be reconsidering the use of american weapons supplied to the rebels. the concern president obama had lying weapons would in effect be involved in a proxy war supported by iran and russia. the other side of the debate is nothing else is working and we need to create pressure on assad and build relationship with people inside syria who might take over one day. another factor is there are rebels, al-qaeda affiliated rebels the united states and the west doesn't support. and i don't think it's in the west's interest to see them end up at the top of the heap. >> rose: and then we turn to the story of the chinese army spying on the american government and american companies with david sanger of the "new york times," dune lawrence and michael riley of bloomberg businessweek. >> the cyber has been off to the side as something of an annoyance. i'm hearing this has gotten so big it's moving to the center of the relationship and it risks the rest of the relationship. i think the next thing you're going to see the president sending some ki
numbers are a positive sign for the u.s. economy. investors were worried about some not so good signals today about europe's economy. stocks turned negative on comments from europe's central bank president saying the strong euro could dampen europe's recovery. here on wall street, the dow fell 42 points, the nasdaq lost three and the s&p slipped over two points. >> tom: still ahead, douglas burtnick joins us, he's with aberdeen asset management. >> susie: a battle is brewing between a big name hedge fund investor and apple. at issue: how to get apple to unlock value for shareholders. today david einhorn of greenlight capital sued apple to block a move that would stop the use of preferred shares. shareholders will vote on this at apple's annual meeting on february 27. what einhorn is proposing is that apple pay out more of its cash hoard to investors, using a special kind of preferred stock. einhorn has a lot at stake: his fund owns more than one million shares of apple, and while the stock rose a bit today, it's down 35% since its peak of $700 last september. late today apple issued thi
explore the legal and other issues surrounding the u.s. policy. >> ifill: then, federal and state governments sue a credit ratings agency it says gave good ratings to bad rtgage investments. >> brown: ray suarez looks at president obama's use of campaign-style events to push his legislative agenda. >> ifill: hari sreenivsan examines a million-dollar match fixing scandal shaking the world of international soccer. >> brown: and playing with the enemy: we have the story of an orchestra of israelis and arabs coming together for music, and maybe more. >> the only way that we can achieve anything that is remotely related to peace is if we sit together and talk or if we at least try to. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> sailing through the heart of historic landscapes you see things differently. you get close to iconic landmarks, to local life, to cultural treasures. it's a feeling that only the river can give you. these are journeys that change your perspective on the world and perhaps even yourself. viking r
. >> reporter: with earnings season winding down, wall street could use some new headlines to chew on. good economic data would be nice. friendly washington politics would also be helpful. tonight's state of the union speech might give investors a clue as to whether that's likely to happen. veteran trader teddy weissberg is hoping president obama will stress the need for bipartisanship but isn't sure that's what he'll hear. >> in terms of tonight, i don't think anybody that i talk to in the wall street arena expects to hear anything terribly dramatic one way or another. >> reporter: since lawmakers and the white house kicked the proverbial can down the road around new years, the stock market has rallied rather nicely. the s&p 500 is up nearly 7% and the dow is about 150 points away from its all-time high. of course, stocks have been getting help from corporate america, too. it turns out fourth quarter profits were better than expected, led by the housing sector and financial firms. >> about 345 companies have reported so far, of which 70% have beaten earnings expectations and 66% have beate
. good t have y with us. here's what is coming up -- far from home. why an egyptian blogger is seeking refuge in poland. on the edge -- why gibraltar is in new haven for spaniards. after the worst -- while londoners are changing their minds about germans. we first turn to the struggle for democracy in egypt. again, supporters of the opposition are being killed exactly two years after the bloody revolution that toppled dictator hosni mubarak. at the time, egyptia enthusiastically ushered in a new era, but the new president has since left many people deeply disappointed. some egyptians are downright worried beethat under the muslim brotherhood, the country has moved even further from democracy. one blogger is one of those who openly criticizes the new government, but he had to leave egypt to be able to do so. >> the market square is a popular tourist destination. usually, it is filled with people strolling through, taking pictures of st. mary's church, but not everyone carrying a camera here today is on holiday. kareem is not a taurus. he is a 28-will blog your -- 28- year-old logger --
>>> and that concludes this edition of "newsli." tokyo.erine kobayashi in thanks for joining us. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> ifill: federal reserve chairman ben bernanke warned lawmakers today that the automatic spending cuts set to take effect friday will hurt the economic recovery. good evening. i'm gwen ifill. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the newshour tonight, we examine the battle over those cuts, and how the paralysis in washington could affect hiring, investment, and more. >> ifill: then, we get the latest on the senate vote to confirm former senator chuck hagel as the next secretary of defense. >> woodruff: ray suarez talks with marcia coyle about today's supreme court arguments over getting a d.n.a. sample from a suspect who was arrested but not convicted of a crime. >> ifill: special correspondent kira kay previews next week's presidential contest in kenya, where memories linger from the violence that followed the 2007 elections. >> we talk about people dead. i think if you count it over time and those who don't know it's probably aro
that the people who put food on our tables use food stamps at twice the rate as the rest of the u.s. workforce. meaning that the people who put food on our tables can't afford to put food on their own family's tables. >> funding is provided by carnegie corporation of new yor celebrating 100 years of philanthropy, and commied to doinreal and permanent good in the world. the kohlberg foundation. independent production fund, with support from the partridge foundation, a john and polly guth charitable fund. the clements foundation. park foundation, dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. the herb alpert foundation, supporting organizations whose mission is to promote compassion and creativity in our society. the bernard and audre rapoport foundation. the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, verdant, and peaceful wor. more information at macfound.org. anne gumowitz. the betsy and jesse fink foundation. the hkh foundation. barbara g. fleischman. and by our sole corporate sponsor, mutual of america, designing customized individual and
been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: the federal government moved another day closer today to $85 billion in automatic spending cuts. and as political charges and counter-charges flew, federal reserve chief ben bernanke raised new fears about the potential economic fallout. the fed chairman told a senate committee that forcing across-the-board spending cuts could slice half a percente point off economic growth. >> i think an appropriate balance would be to introduce these cuts more gradually and to compensate with larger and more sustained cuts in the longer run to address our long-run fiscal issues. >> ifill: bernanke said the sequester was su
of the market-- including u.s. government officials who in 2007 publicly stated that problems in the subprime market appeared to be contained." >> reporter: s&p goes on to argue that the securities at issue in the justice department's case were reviewed by another ratings agen and received the same rating. s&p says it also began downgrading many mortgage securities in 2006, warning that conditions in the housing market were deteriorating. but critics say what matters is what s&p claimed at the time it stamped securities triple a. >> the ratings agencies claim that they have unique analytic abilities and very sophisticated models that enable them to determine the credit worthiness of a bond, a derivative, a security. >> rorter: s&p pointout cou rulings he diissed what it called challenges to a credit rating made with 20/20 hindsight. if the justice department does sue, standard and poor's says it will vigorously defend itself. darren gersh, "n.b.r.," washington. >> tom: still ahead, tonight's word on the street: consumers, the street.com's david peltier joins us with some consumer product stoc
, but not on saturdays. the u.s. postal service is dropping saturday letter deliveries to save billions. >> tom: i'm tom hudson. fresh pain at the pump. american drivers see a steep jump in gas prices: up 15 cents a gallon in the past week alone. >> susie: and the federal reserve says it's been hit, by cyber hackers. we look at u.s. businesses and just how safe their networks are. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> susie: the u.s. postal service says this summer it will stop delivering mail on saturdays, ending a service that began 150 years ago. cutting back to a five-day a week schedule will save $2- billion. the post office has been losing about $20 million a day, as e- mail useage ramps up and mail volume plunges. congress has required the post office to deliver six days a week, but the postmaster general believes there is a loophole in the law that will allow him to make the change. darren gersh reports on the business fallout. >> reporter: first class mail is the postal service's most profitable product. it is also a business that is disappearing at the rate of 5% a year. >> people pay
agreement from the u.s. department of education's ready to learn grant, and viewers like you, thank you. play awesome electric company games and earn points for your favorite person, like me, hector. i mean, i'm your favorite, right? so what are you waiting for? i'm great at telling people what to do. hey kids! pick up that trash. kidding with these, right? hey! (sneezing) bless you! captioning sponsored by wpbt >> this is n.b.r. >> tom: good evening. i'm tom hudson. susie is off tonight. the easy talk, but difficult plans to meet the challenge of creating more middle class jobs. finance ministers and central bankers from the world's biggest economies meet to debate spending cuts versus growth. we look at international investing and pockets of strength around the globe. and, hedge fund manager carl icahn ups his stake in herbalife, calling the vitamin maker a legit business. that and more tonight on "n.b.r." investors spent much of this week focused on the u.s. market with major market indexes hitting five-year highs. but now the spotlight is shifting overseas. g-20 finance minister
edition of "newsne." i'm catherine kobayashi in tokyo. thanks for joining us. >> you are linked to the violent captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> woodruff: evidence suggests that since 2006 a secretive chinese military unit has hacked the computer systems of more than one hundred u.s. corporations and organizations. good evening. i'm judy woodruff. >> ifill: and i'm gwen ifill. on the newshour tonight, we assess the damage done by the cyber attacks, and explore the motivations behind what appear to be china's systematic targeting of foreign firms and governments. >> woodruff: then, we turn to today's arguments at the supreme court over a patent case with implications for biotechnology giant monsanto, and a range of fields from medical research to computer software. >> ifill: we continue our weeklong focus on guns, "after newtown." tonight jeffrey brown reports on the possible links, if any, between violent video games and violent behavior. >> the result clearly shows that playing a violent video game increases aggressive behavior. >> one of the problems in thi
to bement and i couldn't put my finger on what that uncertainty is. and that lead us into a deep dive not numbers. that's who we are. we are a numbers company, very data oriented. and we did a deep dive. and the numbers are stunning. >> rose: we conclude with adam posen, president of the peterson institute. >> for those there are sort of two things, the real versus the monetary, the you have to suffer for your sins versus you have to stop the panic. those are in the sense would be the two schools. >> rose: you're in favor of stopping the panic. >> absolutely. >> rose: and not suffering for your sins to you. >> it to the a morality play f you want to do a morality play we can do lots of things like putting bankers in jails and thing like that but not at the macro level no one is being recorded rdz but most people understand we need entitlement reform and it ought to be on the table. >> absolutely. >> rose: mish phenomenon-- fishman and pos enwhen we continue. >> funding for charlie rose was provided by the following: additional funding provided by these funders:. >> from our studios in
a threat to national security. pal tin palestinians use the tunnels to get around.al tin pa tunnels to get around.l tin pal tunnels to get around. tin pale tunnels to get around.tin paless to get around.in palestinians u to get around.n palestinians us to get around. palestinians useo get around.palestinians use the get around. the blockade has been in place since 2007. morsi has expressed his intention to help people. palestinians in gaza are criticizing the court ruling. >> translator: the gaza strip is under seize. the tunnels are the only d. lifeline for the strip. this is an unjust decision against us. >> hundreds of the tunnels big and small link gaza with egypt. >>> representatives of world powers are getting ready to meet in rome to talk about more ways to help the syrian opposition bring down president assad. kerry met french president in paris ahead of the international meeting. >> we all agree that the time is passed for president assad to heed the voice of his people and the people in the world who want a peaceful transition and a new opportunity for syria. >> kerry says assad
. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> suarez: the world witnessed something today it had not seen since the 15th century: a sitting pope, benedict xvi, announced he is giving up the papacy. the news reverberated around the globe and stunned many of the world's 1.2 billion catholics. >> it was a big surprise because this doesn't happen all the time. and my first reaction was to pray and to call my friends, texted my friends and asked even my non-catholic and nonbelieving friends to keep us in their thoughts and in their prayers. >> i had never heard anything like this in my life. the pope has to be there until he dies. and he is resigning? >> popes can't resign. this hasn't happened in 600 years. a pope
as they did their football club, and there are plenty of fans. >> berlusconi is charming. he lets us believe in the future. he is like a life raft people cling to. >> but not everyone has so much faith. some say that after four elections, berlusconi has had enough chances to reform italy. >> after 20 years and so many promises, you really have to ask wh he has actually done. he has a poor record. he can conduct another great campaign. people are sick of politicians who make promises they just do not keep. >> berlusconi has a village just a few kilometers away. this is where many of the infamous parties are posted. in what has become known as the ruby case, berlusconi is bng tried on charges of paying for sex with minors. the verdict is expected after the elections. this town has distanced itself from its most famous inhabitant. the democratic left has been in power here for two years. the mayor wants to promote a more positive image. >> we do not want to hear about the scandals and more. a woman rules as mayor here. there's a majority of women on the council. they speak professionally, with
doing to them. >> rose: as you remember from the balkans, people used to say that history would judge the world's outside powers badly if they did not do something. that thereas aoral imperative. is this similar? >> i feel that way. i think -- the question is what, however. and i do think that the international powers are doing quite a lot in terms of humanitarian assistance. the united states, for instance, has provided something like $50 million in humanitarian assistance. has been supporting the various groups to unite and give them -- recognize them, frankly. and then also try to be helpful in finding some kind of a diplomatic solution to this. i think t ral issue comes down to what kind of military action and not every place is amenable to having some kind of military action. >> rose: is syria? >> in syria i think that we have to keep examining trying to figure out what can be done. i think it's hard, charlie, i really do. >> rose: secretary of state clinton, who you worked with, panetta petraeus, all recommended we do something. and the president said no, and you say the preside
the cover story of this week's "time" magazine. it is called bitter pill, why medical bills are killing us. it is the longest piece by a single author ever published by time. it took brill seven months to research and write. he analyzes bills from hospitals, doctors an drug companies to paint an extraordinary picture of medical overspendingment i'm pleased to have stef steven brill back at this table, welcome. >> thanks, charlie. >> rose: what got you here this longest piece. >> as you know i like t pick topics where i just feel that i'm curious about them. and for a long time i have just been curious about why health-care costs so much. you know, we've had years of debate about who should pay for health care. how should we do insurance, and who should pay the bills. but i've never seen anyone stop to say hey, wait a minute, how come if will cost you 20 or 25,000 dollars if god-- as you're walking ot of this building, you slip-and-fall and land on your elbow. whwill it cost a million dollars if are you diagnosed th cancer, how come, who's getting the money. >> rose: you, because of all you
lincoln has asked us to work with him to accompli the death of slavery. >> no one's ever been loved is so much by the people. don't waste that power. >> this fight is for the united states of america. >> de choose to be born or are we fitted to the times we're born into. >> well, i done know about myself, you, maybe. >> this set els the fate for all coming times. not only the millions now in bondage, but of unborn millions to come. shall we stop this bleeding? >> i am pleased to have tony kushner back at this table. what does adapted screenplay mean. because there's a lot more here than doris'sook. >> yeah, i mean the book in 2000 before doris had actually finished it and it was the book that steven asked me to adapt, i read it eagerly and i love it. i think it's a masterpiece. but team of rivals is a 900 page four-way political biography, the living definition of something that isn't going to make a feature length film. and steven i think knew that when he was getting chapter by chapter. so i think that whene say that it was adapted from team of rivals what we mean and i think is the cre
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)